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Travel and Tourism Industry Boosts Connecticut Economy By Nearly $10 Billion
Study Shows Industry is an Important Job, Tax, Revenue Creator

(HARTFORD, CT) MAY 7, 2003 - A new, comprehensive study by the Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis at the University of Connecticut shows that the travel and tourism industry boosted the state's economy in 2001 by nearly $10 billion, state officials announced today.

According to the study, tourists in Connecticut spent an estimated $9.9 billion in 2001, generating significant fiscal activity and financial advantages, including:

  • the creation of $9.5 billion in Gross State Product (6% of state total)
  • the creation of $10.3 billion in personal income (7% of state total)
  • 146,178 jobs in CT (8.6% of state total)
  • $1.4 billion in state taxes and revenues (11% of state total)
  • $951 million in local taxes and revenues (14% of state total)

"Tourism is now a major part of our State's economy," said First Lady Patricia Rowland, Honorary Chairperson of the Connecticut Tourism Council, the state council that commissioned the study. "It not only generates significant jobs and tax revenues, but it is also a major contributor to the high quality of life that Connecticut is known for. Working together, our attractions, special events, museums, campgrounds, lodging establishments and marinas present Connecticut as a great place to live, work and play. Travel and tourism benefit all Connecticut residents."

The study also shows that Connecticut's travel and tourism industry now employs more people (13.35%) than the state's manufacturing sector (12.95%), and its financial, insurance and real estate (FIRE) sectors (8.16%). In fact, it shows that travel and tourism employment has grown faster than manufacturing and FIRE for the past 10 years. In 1993, the travel and tourism industry generated about 56,000 jobs, or about one third of the current total.

"The fact that tourism has continued to increase in Connecticut is a testament to the industry's resilience and its stability as a long term growth vehicle," said Edward Dombroskas, Executive Director, Connecticut Office of Tourism, Department of Economic and Community Development. "Even in tough economic times, Connecticut is a beneficiary of its geographic location and its image as a safe, secure destination for getaways."

"The big picture news is that tourism is up, and it's being led by leisure tourism. That's good news to report when state and national economies are down," Dombroskas said, "but what we learned beyond that is even more important. This study confirms that tourism is a significant girder in the structure of our state's economy, and that we are getting an excellent return on our investment in marketing tourism. In 2002, the Connecticut Office of Tourism saw a $303 million return on its $6 million investment in advertising, marketing and public relations."

The UConn study identifies expenditure patterns in nine categories (recreation, meals, shopping, fuel, other auto, local transportation, lodging, gaming wagers and marina sales) with statewide figures totaling:

  • $1.9 billion for spending on recreation
  • $1.7 billion for spending on meals
  • $1.8 billion for spending on shopping
  • $634 million for spending on fuel
  • $309 million for spending on other auto
  • $175 million for spending on local transportation
  • $993 million for spending on lodging
  • $2.1 billion for spending on gaming wagers
  • $308 million for spending on marina sales

In a breakdown by tourism district, the study shows Southeastern Connecticut with the highest overall travel and tourism expenditures in 2001:

  • Central CT: $257 million in expenditures, including $57 million in meals and $51 million in recreation
  • Coastal Fairfield: $744 million in expenditures, including $159 million in lodging and $124 million in shopping
  • CT River Valley: $1.3 billion in expenditures, including $457 million in shopping and $252 million in recreation
  • Greater Hartford: $1.1 billion in expenditures, including $269 million in meals and $212 million in recreation
  • Greater New Haven: $1.3 billion in expenditures, including $384 million in recreation and $308 million in shopping
  • Housatonic Valley: $164 million in expenditures, including $35 million in lodging and $27 million in recreation
  • Litchfield Hills: $334 million in expenditures, including $76 million in shopping and $66 million in meals
  • North Central: $311 million in expenditures, including $75 million in meals and $59 million in recreation
  • Northeastern CT: $363 million in expenditures, including $115 million in recreation and $128 million in wagers
  • Southeastern CT: $3.4 billion in expenditures, including $1.5 billion in wagers and $450 million in recreation
  • Waterbury Region: $563 million in expenditures, including $161 million in recreation and $134 million in shopping

The 2001 UConn study presents the most comprehensive look at Connecticut's travel and tourism industry to date because it includes data from more categories than previous studies, state officials said. In addition to lodging, campground and marina surveys conducted by CCEA, the 2001 study includes data from day-trippers and people visiting friends and relatives resulting from 6,000 field intercept studies conducted by Witan Intelligence Strategies, Inc. of Avon, CT. Other data sources included gross lodging receipts supplied by the state Department of Revenue Services, and the Travel Industry Association's Travelscope Study.

The CCEA, in operation since 1992, is an outreach organization for forecasting that publishes "The Connecticut Economy: A University of Connecticut Quarterly Review." For more information on CCEA, or to review the study's findings, visit http://ccea.uconn.edu.

Direct Links to findings:
The 2001 Economic Impact of Connecticut's Travel and Tourism Industry (Executive Summary)
The 2001 Economic Impact of Connecticut's Travel and Tourism Industry (Full Report)

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EDITOR'S NOTE: Copies of the CCEA study, with regional breakout information, can be obtained from the Connecticut Office of Tourism, Department of Economic and Community Development, located at 505 Hudson Street, Hartford, CT 06106, 860-270-8080.

Media Contacts:

Ed Dombroskas, Office of Tourism, 860-270-8075

Kathleen Goffa, MD&C, Inc., 203-624-4151, ext. 30

 

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